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In recent times, the verification of heap-manipulating programs, and static analyses in particular, has seen substantial success, largely due to the development of ‘Separation Logics’ (SLs). SLs provide embedded support for ‘local reasoning’: reasoning about the resource(s) being modified, instead of the state of the entire system. This form of reasoning is enabled by new syntax (dedicated atomic proposition and separating connectives) and corresponding semantics. Such expressivity comes with the inherent difficulty of automating these logics. Combining this power with induction/recursion allows to concisely specify a large class of recursive data structures and programs, but further increases the computational burden.

This has led to a fruitful search for restrictions of SLs which guarantee tractabilty. At the same time, this progress hints at possible generalisations, which would benefit the field significantly through SMT-like standardisation of tools and theories.

This workshop aims at bringing together academic researchers and industrial practitioners focused on improving the state of the art of automated deduction methods for SLs. We will consider technical submissions on topics which include :

  • the integration of SLs with SMT,

  • decision procedures for SLs and sister logics such as Bunched Implication Logic,

  • computational complexity of problems such as satisfiability, entailment and abduction,

  • alternative semantics and computation models based on the notion of resource,

  • application of separation and resource logics to different fields, such as sociology and biology;

Call for Papers

The goal of this workshop is to bring together academic researchers and industrial practitioners focused on improving the state of the art of automated deduction methods for Separation Logics. We will consider technical submissions presenting work on the following topics (the list is not exclusive):

  • the integration of Separation Logics with SMT,
  • proof search and automata-based decision procedures for Separation Logics and sister logics such as Bunched Implication Logic,
  • computational complexity of logical problems such as satisfiability, entailment and abduction;
  • alternative semantics and computation models based on the notion of resource;
  • application of separation and resource logics to different fields, such as sociology and biology.